Past & Present Collaborators

Bernard Loeffke

US Major General (R) Bernard Loeffke

General Loeffke currently works with PATH Foundation NY on projects involving radiation prophylaxis as well as our capstone program materials.

Bernard “Burn” Loeffke is a West Point graduate. He has a BS in Engineering, a MA in Russian, and a PhD in Political Sciences. He has taught graduate school at Georgetown University.

General Loeffke has commanded Special Forces and parachute combat infantry units. He culminated his military career as the Commanding General of Army South. He was awarded the Purple Heart for his wounds in combat, as well as the Silver Star and the Bronze Star of Valor.

General Loeffke is also the first American to have jumped with Communist Chinese units. He earned this distinction when he became the first US Army General to be assigned to the American Embassy after the Communist takeover. General Loeffke also served as the Army Attaché in Moscow, as a staff officer in the White House, and as the Director of the Commission on White House Fellows.

The General retired from the Army in 1992 and immediately started his medical career. He finished his studies as a physician’s assistant in 1997 and had his first taste of missionary medicine in a combat zone in Africa. He now participates in medical missions in war-torn and impoverished areas such as Bosnia, Haiti, Kenya, Iraq, Niger, Darfur, and the Amazon Jungles.


Kenneth Blum, Ph.D.

Kenneth Blum, Ph.D.

Kenneth Blum, PhD is currently Chairman of the Board and Chief Scientific Officer of LifeGen, Inc. San Diego, California and managing partner of Reward Deficiency Solutions, LLC, in San Diego, California. He serves as Senior Scientific Advisor for G & G Holistic Addictions Treatment Center, North Miami Beach, Florida, USA. He is currently Full Professor of the Department of Psychiatry and McKnight Brain Institute University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville Florida.

Dr. Blum's work at PATH Foundation extends into many different areas from hands-on research to mentoring our young and bright PATH scholars. Dr. Blum is currently working on several studies which include the effects of Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) on menopausal women and the benefits of chelation therapy in urban environments. Both his time and efforts have helped the Foundation to grow scientifically and move forward with prospective studies.

He has received numerous awards including NIDA Career Teacher Award; American Chemical Society Speakers Award; Gordon Conference Research Award; Presidential Excellence award (National Council of Alcoholism and Drug Abuse). Dr Blum has authored and edited eleven books and has published over 400 peer reviewed papers. He coined "Brain Reward Cascade and Reward Deficiency Syndrome (RDS)" and is credited as the lead author in the first association of the Dopamine D2 receptor gene with severe alcoholism (JAMA, 1990). He is considered by many as the father of "Psychiatric Genetics." He is credited with co-discovering the first gene [DOPAMINE D2 RECEPTOR GENE] to associate with not only alcoholism but reward dependence in general. He holds over 20 patents. He is also the father of Neuroadaptagen Amino-Acid Therapy (NAAT) for the recovery field.

Dr. Blum's research has been covered by every major newspaper in the world and he has made numerous television appearances. He has been featured in Time, Newsweek, Business, O magazine, Discover Magazine, American Scientist, Economics, among many others. His work has received both Silver and Bronze medals from The Natural Products Association in 2006 and 2007. Dr Blum has published in almost every major scientific journal worldwide-: Science; Lancet; Nature; PNAS, JAMA among others. He is actively investigating the role of natural dopamine agonists as an anti craving DNA directed therapeutic target for prevention of relapse.


Nirav R. Shah, M.D., M.P.H.

Nirav R. Shah, M.D., M.P.H.

Dr. Braverman has worked with Commissioner Shah on a study where DEXA was compared to BMI, to see which served as a more accurate predictor in obesity.

Nirav R. Shah, MD, MPH, is the 15th New York State Commissioner of Health. His nomination by Governor Andrew M. Cuomo was confirmed by the State Senate on January 24, 2011, making him the first Indian-American to serve as State Commissioner of Health as well as the youngest person named to the post.

Before his government service, Dr. Shah was an attending physician at Bellevue Hospital Center in Manhattan, associate investigator at the Geisinger Center for Health Research in central Pennsylvania, and assistant professor at the New York University School of Medicine in value and comparative effectiveness.

Dr. Shah is a fellow of the American College of Physicians and the New York Academy of Medicine. He has served on the editorial boards of medical journals, has published more than 90 peer-reviewed articles, and has received more than $4.5 million in research funding. He is certified in internal medicine by the American Board of Internal Medicine.


Nora Volkow, M.D.

Nora Volkow, M.D.

Nora D. Volkow, MD, became Director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) at the National Institute of Health in May 2003. As a research psychiatrist and scientist, Dr. Volkow pioneered the use of brain imaging to investigate the toxic effects of drugs and their addictive properties. Her studies have documented changes in the dopamine system affecting the actions of frontal brain regions involved with motivation, drive, and pleasure and the decline of brain dopamine function with age. She has also made important contributions to the neurobiology of obesity, ADHD, and the behavioral changes that occur with aging.

Dr. Volkow also served as a scientific chairperson alongside Dr. Braverman at the First Conference on 'Reward Deficiency Syndrome': Genetic Antecedents and Clinical Pathways.

Aside from working with her on several past Molecular Psychiatry publications, Eric Braverman, MD recently hosted Nora D. Volkow, MD at PATH Foundation NY's seminar at Weill Cornell Medical College.


Robert Baker, Ph.D.

Robert Baker, Ph.D.

Robert Baker, PhD is a Professor of Genome Organization, Chromosome Evolution, and Mammalogy in the Department of Biological Sciences at Texas Tech University (TTU). He is also the Director and Curator of Mammals and Genetic Resources at the Natural Science Research Laboratory in the Museum of TTU. His research centers on genome organization and evolutionary biology and how recent advances in providing genetic data can assist in understanding mammalian evolution. Another area of interest is chromosomal evolution with a focus on in situ hybridization. The laboratory also places an emphasis on identifying DNA markers to establish natal origin of populations, sex of individuals, and cultivar identifications with an ultimate goal of providing resolution and information critical to managing and understanding populations and cultivars. Dr. Baker is currently working with PATH on our research projects.


Ernest Nobel, M.D., Ph.D.

Ernest Nobel, M.D., Ph.D.

Ernest P. Noble, MD, PhD, is a biochemist and clinical psychiatrist. He joined the faculty at the University of California, Los Angeles in 1981. After many years as a faculty member at Stanford University and the University of California at Irvine, Dr. Noble became the Director of the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) in Washington, DC (1976-78). After coming to UCLA in 1981, he was appointed the Pike Professor of Alcohol Studies and Director of the UCLA Alcohol Research Center. Dr. Noble was also former Vice-President of the National Council on Alcoholism, and former President of the International Commission for the Prevention of Alcoholism and Drug Dependency.

He performed research as a Fulbright Scholar at the Sorbonne in Paris, France, as a Guggenheim Fellow at the Centre de Neurochimie in Strasbourg, France, and as a Senior Fulbright Scholar at the Max-Planck Institute for Psychiatry in Munich, Germany. Dr. Noble has over 400 scientific and medical publications and is a member of numerous editorial boards and scientific and professional societies, and has received many honors for his achievements.

Dr. Noble served as a conference co-chairperson alongside Dr. Braverman at the First Conference on 'Reward Deficiency Syndrome': Genetic Antecedents and Clinical Pathways


Eliot Gardner, Ph.D.

Eliot Gardner, Ph.D.

Eliot L. Gardner, PhD, came to the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York City in 1969 as a Postdoctoral Fellow in Pharmacology and Neurology, and has remained at Albert Einstein since. He is currently Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Professor of Neuroscience, and Director of Basic Research in Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Albert Einstein. Dr. Gardner serves as a scientific consultant to both the U.S. and Canadian governments, is an editorial consultant to more than 20 journals in the fields of psychiatry and neuroscience, and is the author of more than 160 papers and publications in neuropharmacology, psychopharmacology, and behavioral neuroscience. He is a recipient of the prestigious Career Scientist Award of the Health Research Council of New York, was elected a Fellow of the American Psychological Association in 1992 for his outstanding contributions to the field of psychopharmacology; and was elected a Fellow of the APA's Division of Behavioral Neurosciences in 1996 for outstanding contributions to neuroscience.


George Uhl, M.D., Ph.D.

George Uhl, M.D., Ph.D.

George Uhl, MD, Ph.D. is Chief of NIDA's Molecular Neurobiology Branch and Adjunct Associate Professor of Neurology and Neuroscience at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. Dr. Uhl's research focuses on the identification of allelic variants associated with vulnerability to addiction in humans. Dr. Uhl provides Training Program fellows with educational and research opportunities on genetic factors of drug dependence. Dr. Uhl has participated as a speaker in the Training Program lecture series.

Dr. Uhl served as a scientific chairperson alongside Dr. Braverman at the First Conference on 'Reward Deficiency Syndrome': Genetic Antecedents and Clinical Pathways.


David E. Smith, M.D.

David E. Smith, M.D.

David E. Smith, MD founded the Haight Ashbury Free Clinics in June of 1967. He works with impaired health professionals in his private practice, David E. Smith, MD & Associates, in San Francisco. He is Former Executive Medical Director of the Prometa Center, in Santa Monica, California and is a past President of the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) and of the California Society of Addiction Medicine (CSAM). Dr. Smith is the Founder and Executive Editor of the journal of psychoactive Drugs.

Dr. Smith is recognized as a national leader in the areas of the treatment of addictive disease, the psychopharmacology of drugs, new research strategies in the management of drug abuse problems, and appropriate prescribing practices for physicians. He lectures on the management, legal implications and repercussions of dependence on psychoactive drugs, including cocaine, alcohol and prescription drugs. He also speaks on the subjects of impaired and recovering physicians, substance abuse in the workplace and dual diagnosis disorders.

He teaches that addiction is a primary medical illness which is best treated in a multidisciplinary integrated fashion with an abstinence-oriented model of recovery utilizing the group process and the 12-Step programs of Alcoholics Anonymous, Narcotics Anonymous and Cocaine Anonymous as central to the process of recovery. He has worked closely with Kenneth Blum, PhD, Scientific Director of the PATH Foundation.


Irwin Redlener, M.D.

Irwin Redlener, M.D.

Dr. Irwin Redlener is a recognized national leader in disaster preparedness and the public health ramifications of terrorism and large-scale catastrophic events. He and his team have developed major programs to enhance public health and health systems readiness with respect to disasters. He has written and spoken widely on the response to Hurricane Katrina, U.S. readiness for pandemics and the concerns of children as potential targets of terrorism. Dr. Redlener has also had more than three decades of experience providing healthcare to medically underserved children in rural and urban communities throughout the U.S. As founder and president of the ChildrenTs Health Fund, he is a renowned advocate for access to healthcare for all children. Dr. Redlener served as a principal developer and president of the new ChildrenTs Hospital at Montefiore in the Bronx. He has been a formal and informal adviser to the president and various cabinet members since 1993, over the last few years working with key members of the U.S. Congress on disaster preparedness and child health access. In 1993 & 1994, Dr. Redlener served as special consultant to the National Health Reform Task Force for the Clinton White House. He has taught medical students in rural Honduras and has led or assisted in international disaster relief in Central America and Africa. Dr. Redlener has also created a series of direct medical relief programs and public health initiatives in the Gulf region ravaged by Hurricane Katrina.


Kenneth Perinne, Ph.D.

Kenneth Perinne, Ph.D.

Kenneth Perrine, PhD, is a clinical neuropsychologist and the Director of Neuropsychology at the Northeast Regional Epilepsy Group. He performs neuropsychological evaluations, Wada Testing, and Cortical Mapping for those affected with epilepsy and neurosurgery services at New York Presbyterian Hospital/Weill-Cornell Medical Center and other tri-state hospitals. He is also a Clinical Assistant Professor of Neuropsychology in Neurological Surgery at Weill-Cornell Medical College.

Dr. Perrine's role at the PATH Foundation NY has been as a researcher on multiple studies, including a study of the contribution of PET scans and evoked potentials as early markers of Mild Cognitive Impairment and dementia and a study on the hormonal correlations in female menopausal patients as a function of somatic and neurological symptom clusters.